H. L. A. Hart and Lord Devlin 

The past has always been more interesting to me than the future, just as I have found pessimists more amusing than optimists and failures more attractive than successes. I do not say that my preferences are based upon universal principles or that everyone should share them; in any case I should not want to live in a world of mental clones of myself, even if it were possible. I merely describe my own preferences as they happen to be.

Now that my personal past is longer than my personal future, it is perhaps not surprising that I tend to dwell on, and even to live in, that past. The...

 

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