Ian Worthington --> reviewed by Bruce S. Thornton -->

The outsized glamour of the life and conquests of Alexander the Great have obscured for us the achievements of his father, Philip II. Yet in many ways Philip’s deeds are as historically significant as those of his son. Indeed, Alexander’s success would not have been possible if not for his remarkable father, who, in the words of the historian Diodorus Siculus, “established his kingdom as the greatest of the powers of Europe.” Now, thanks to Ian Worthington’s lively new biography, readers can more fully understand the circumstances and origins of the world-changing transformation of the ancient Mediterranean initiated by Philip, who as Worthington writes, “deserves to live beyond the shadow of his...

 

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