The recent publication in England and simultaneous importation into this country of a nine-LP set on the Pearl label of recordings made by three pupils of Clara Schumann (1819-1896) will doubtless excite interest among students and admirers of piano-playing.[1] It is not difficult to see why this should be so: Clara Schumann, of course, was the widow of the great Robert (1810-1856), and a close friend over many years of Johannes Brahms; furthermore, she was by all accounts one of the great musicianly pianists of the second half of the nineteenth century. Because she was a renowned teacher, and because she gave lessons until her death in the mid-1890s, she taught several pianists who played professionally during the subsequent era of sound recording, and two of her pupils lived long enough to make private recordings at a time when tape recording made the capture of extended performances in...

 
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